Round Table Farm

Donkeys, Goats, Books and Chickens

Yet Another Cat Abscess

Old Stout snoozing on my pillow.

Old Stout snoozing on my pillow.

We’ve gotten pretty good at dealing with cat abscesses. Most of the time, we just let them pop on their own and then give them a good cleaning. They scab over and all is well.

Alas, that was not the case with our elderly cat Stout. His abscess, located behind his right ear and curving down the side of his neck, was huge. Also, when it did pop, it popped near the top, instead of the bottom, and therefore, gravity held a bunch of the puss inside the cavity. Basically, his flesh started to die and rot. It stank.

Stout after his visit with the Vet.

Stout after his visit with the Vet.

At the vet’s office, they were able to cut away much of the necrotic flesh (though they did leave a small flap to help hold the tissue together until Stout’s body could naturally slough it off). They irrigated the cavity, cleaning out the puss, and added a drainage hole at the bottom so that any further fluids could also drain away.

The Nitrofurazone Pledge: I use this on you, I don't get to eat you.

The Nitrofurazone Pledge: I use this on you, I don’t get to eat you.

He got two medications – one a liquid antibiotic that I gave him daily, and then nitrofurazone. It’s a bright yellow-green antibiotic cream that is used on non-food animals. Basically, if we use this on an animal, we have to swear whole-heartedly that we will not slaughter and eat the animal. It was easy to make such a promise to Stout. (Basically, such a rule to help reduce the amount of antibiotics entering the food chain, and hence reduce antibiotic resistance in humans). Anyway, we got to smear this stuff on Stout once a day, using a popsicle stick to gently push the cream into the cavity. It’s water soluble, so the excess washed off easily each day during his daily doctoring. Yep, he got liquid meds with breakfast and in the evening we wrapped him in a towel, washed out his wound with warm water, and reapplied the cream.

8 days later and Stout is recovering well.

8 days later and Stout is recovering well.

As you can see, after just 8 days his abscess cavity has filled in quite well. I think the daily tuna and organic half & half also helped.

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2 Comments

  1. Poor guy! That nitrofurazone works miracles, I have used it on my non-food-horse many times as well. I’m glad he’s doing better.

    • Yep, great stuff. We have used it on our donkeys and a pet goat. The animals seem to take well to it.

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